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Editor's Note

By Allison Ramay

Dear Readers,

Our 15th issue of English Studies in Latin America opens with an illustration of geese “saying goodbye”, an image expressed in Graciela Huinao’s poem “Los gansos dicen adios”, translated by Margaret Towner. The arrival and exit of geese on the pampas parallels the life of the person looking and who will soon be gone forever. Memories of life lived and translation, together allowing us to connect across the borders of a single language, shine through in each section of this issue.  [ . . . ]

Sincerely,

Allison Ramay
ESLA Editor
 

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Editors' Note

By Andrea Casals and Allison Ramay

Dear Readers,

This special issue focuses on indigenous writings and covers many of the topics included in our Call for Papers: politics and poetics, issues of sovereignty, indigenous feminisms and resistance through indigenous epistemologies. Each section reflects multiple experiences and critical approaches as well as disciplinary perspectives (history, literature and education), challenging our understanding of academic writing in the humanities..  [ . . . ]

Sincerely,

The Directors of English Studies in Latin America

Andrea Casals and Allison Ramay

 

esla13 

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Editors' Note

By Allison Ramay and Andrea Casals

Dear Readers,

We would like to begin the Note for Issue 13 to announce an important shift in the life of our digital journal: since 2014 we have been White Rabbit: English Studies in Latin America, a name that reflected the imaginative excitement with which we began. After publishing just over 10 issues, we have decided to ammend our title so that it reflects more precisely our aim: to offer a platform for writers who are thinking about literatures in English from Latin America through cultural studies. Our revised title, English Studies in Latin America: A Journal of Cultural and Literary Criticism, accentuates our interest in providing a space for transnational, intellectual and imaginary exchange, with an emphasis on perspectives with an awareness of Latin America. Gabriela Mistral’s experience in Santa Barbara, California and Walt Whitman walking through the hallways of the Universidad de Concepción in Chile are moments that we have captured through articles, thanks to our readers/writers whose linguistic and cultural sensitivities brought them to analyze these cross-border, literary moments. Our history as White Rabbit will remain available as always on our webpage, now with a new URL: www.esla.letras.uc.cl [ . . . ]

Sincerely,

The Directors of White Rabbit: English Studies in Latin America

Andrea Casals and Allison Ramay

 

issue 

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Directors’ Note

By Andrea Casals and Allison Ramay

Dear Readers,

Not too long ago, when my children were small, they had a book about a time when summer lingered into autumn, raising the temperatures, and then winter did not want to be alone so he stayed all through springtime, making it a very cold spring, where flowers couldn’t bloom. The book had colorful subtle illustrations, giving the story a fairy tale aura. What seemed a fantasy, appears today as a tragic reality. As we finish editing this ecological issue, summer has just begun here in the southern hemisphere, and we have already had much warmer than average days for this time of the year. Academic discussion of this phenomenon is gradually taking over the Humanities. As Mita Valvassori from Universidad de Los Lagos argues in the column she presents in this issue, little by little ecocriticism has gained momentum among graduate and undergraduate students here; yet, because most green cultural theory is written in English, in this southern land, it is a very challenging task. Nonetheless, we are very proud to introduce this special ecological issue one year after the Paris Agreement on Climate Change.  [ . . . ]

Sincerely,

The Directors of White Rabbit: English Studies in Latin America

Andrea Casals and Allison Ramay

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Directors’ Note

By Andrea Casals and Allison Ramay

Dear Readers,

The cover for this issue is inspired by the critical articles and poems included, which reflect either directly or indirectly the notion that poetry lifts (or has the potential to lift) our spirits. In this issue, three poets weave together, space, time and creatures. In Peggy Aylsworth's collection of poems we find personae who are witty and insightful travelers and observers who reflect on the meeting between nature and urban space in multiple geographic regions. July Westhale publishes two poems with WR ESLA; one that depicts the timelessness of death and another in which the persona reports hearing a man imagine his power over girls who are lost and silent, as if a warning to readers. In Liukura Mariman's poem "Underneath the Canopies", the persona speaks to a colorful and delicate bird that emits song in the form of string ("an echoed strum, your quaking strings"). Carefully-crafted imagery invites us to admire the unnamed, American-originating "wandering bird". [ . . . ]

Sincerely,

The Directors of White Rabbit: English Studies in Latin America

Andrea Casals and Allison Ramay

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